London,
06
March
2015
|
13:13
Europe/Amsterdam

Disabled young artists to benefit from City Bridge Trust grant

Nearly three years after featuring in the Opening Ceremony for the London 2012 Paralympics, Graeae Theatre Company (GTC) has received a grant of £138,000 from the City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge Trust, to boost an artistic programme for disabled young Londoners.

Since 1980, Hackney-based GTC has showcased the work of disabled artists including Silent Witness star, Liz Carr, and broadened the audience for their theatrical productions.

The programme, involving disabled children and young people across London, has three key elements. First, six disabled young people will be supported to develop their theatre-related skills. Secondly, workshops in schools will provide an introduction to the programme, leading to the third strand, where school residencies will enable disabled children to be inspired by disabled role models to create their own art.

Jodi Alissa Bickerton, training and learning manager at GTC, said:

“We feel a responsibility to say to our young artistic advisors, and all the disabled children and young people we work with: ‘You are the creative leaders. Tell us what you want to do next and we’ll provide the platform and support to make it happen.’ This City Bridge Trust support will help ensure that these important voices are never lost. Some will become artists of the future and others will use the experience to take ownership of how they interact with the world around them.”

Jeremy Mayhew, Chairman of City Bridge Trust, said: “Engaging these young people in theatre-based activities plays an important part in improving their well-being. At City Bridge Trust, we are committed to increasing disabled people’s full participation in society, including arts and culture. We commend Graeae Theatre Company’s endeavour to transform the lives of young people with a disability.”

City Bridge Trust is the grant-making arm of Bridge House Estates, whose sole trustee is the City of London Corporation. It addresses disadvantage by supporting London charities and providing grants totalling around £15 million annually.

Notes to editors:

Media enquiries: Julie Zhu, Media Officer, City of London Corporation

T 020 7332 3451

E julie.zhu@cityoflondon.gov.uk

About the City of London CorporationThe City of London Corporation has three roles: we support London’s communities by working in partnership with neighbouring boroughs on economic regeneration and skills projects. The Corporation supports education - with three independent schools and three City Academies – plus a primary school and the world-renowned Guildhall School of Music and Drama. We also help look after key London heritage and green spaces including Tower Bridge, Museum of London, Barbican Arts Centre, City gardens, Hampstead Heath, Epping Forest, Burnham Beeches, and important ‘commons’ in south London. And – with its heart in London’s Square Mile - we also support and promote the ‘City’ as a world-leading financial and business hub, with outward and inward business delegations, high-profile civic events, research-driven policies and a long-term approach. See www.cityoflondon.gov.uk for much more on our uniquely diverse role, including the City of London Police, etc.

The City of London Corporation’s charity, the City Bridge Trust, makes grants totalling around £15 million annually to charitable projects across London. More information can be found at www.citybridgetrust.org.uk.