City of London,
17
March
2015
|
00:00
Europe/Amsterdam

City approves 160 Aldersgate; 21 Moorfields; creates new public square

The City’s Planning & Transportation Committee has today (17 March) approved two office buildings, 160 Aldersgate and 21 Moorfields, which will help provide much needed high-quality office space in the City.

160 Aldersgate was a revised proposal after an original proposal was rejected in December 2014. The revisions included removing windows facing residential properties, increasing the width of the planting on terraces and only allowing access to the terraces on Monday – Friday 8am-9pm. The revised scheme also excludes retail. The current building is not considered to be a high-quality post-modern building and the new scheme is an appropriate replacement. The revised scheme was approved 19-3 with one abstention.

Speaking at the Committee meeting, Annie Hampson, Chief Planning Officer said: “The new scheme achieves high quality floorspace in a highly accessible location. It safeguards heritage assets and residential amenity and I recommend it for approval.”

Planning Committee Chairman Michael Welbank added: “This proposal turns out-dated offices into first class space, which is in accordance with our Local Plan, aiming to maintain our position as a world-leading financial centre. We have a lack of office space in the City which this building will help to address. The developers have made compromises and I am pleased this scheme will be going ahead.”

21 Moorfields is a new scheme which will develop office space over the new Crossrail Station and Moorgate underground station. This is a difficult space in which to construct a building as there are few places into which a major pile can be sunk. The profile of the building is angled to protect views of St Paul’s Cathedral, and the building has been designed to minimise light seepage with fins to ensure that light will not impact on Barbican residents. The west building will be suitable for SMEs, a major group of occupiers in the City.

A major element of the new building will be a new City Walkway which will create more direct routes for pedestrians, and a new public space for the City, which will be open to the public except for some private events. This accords with the City’s Local Plan, when taken as a whole. The scheme was unanimously approved.

Speaking at the Committee meeting, Annie Hampson, Chief Planning Officer said: “This is a well-designed, well-engineered building and the developers have worked closely with the Barbican residents to ensure it is acceptable to them. I recommend the scheme for approval.”

Planning Committee Chairman Michael Welbank said: “This building will provide excellent office space in a very skilful architectural solution. I am very pleased that this scheme will be going ahead.”

Ends

Notes to editors

Media Enquiries

Bella Longman, Media Officer, City of London Corporation

Tel: 020 7332 1906 / Mobile: 07809 334 327

Email: bella.longman@cityoflondon.gov.uk

About the City of London Corporation 

The City of London Corporation provides local government and policing services for the financial and commercial heart of Britain, the 'Square Mile'. In addition, the City Corporation has three roles: (1) we support London’s communities by working in partnership with neighbouring boroughs on economic regeneration, education and skills projects. In addition, the City of London Corporation’s charity City Bridge Trust makes grants of more than £15 million annually to charitable projects across London and we also support education with three independent schools, three City Academies, a primary school and the world-renowned Guildhall School of Music and Drama. (2) We also help look after key London heritage and green spaces including Tower Bridge, Museum of London, Barbican Arts Centre, City gardens, Hampstead Heath, Epping Forest, Burnham Beeches, and important ‘commons’ in south London. (3) And we also support and promote the ‘City’ as a world-leading financial and business hub, with outward and inward business delegations, high-profile civic events, research-driven policies all reflecting a long-term approach. See www.cityoflondon.gov.uk for more details.