london,
19
May
2017
|
14:28
Europe/Amsterdam

Free learning project engages thousands of young Londoners

Over 4000 school children have taken part in a free and innovative outdoor education project.

The City of London Corporation, which manages Hampstead Heath, has created the free Ponds Project Education Programme to take advantage of learning opportunities provided by a dam-strengthening engineering scheme on some of Heath’s ponds.

Activities include building mini-dams, investigating water quality and exploring the properties of soil.

The sessions, both practical and classroom based, are available to secondary schools and aim to educate young people in a range of topics, including science, geography and citizenship.

The programme has engaged over 3300 secondary students in 25 different schools and nearly 1000 primary school children.

The project is part of the Hampstead Heath Ponds Project, a complex engineering and landscaping development, designed to make sure that the earth dams on the Heath can withstand extreme rainfall events.

Archaeological findings, some thousands of years old, have been uncovered during the Ponds Project.

Susie Glover, Education Project Officer at the City of London Corporation, said:

“The Ponds Project Education Programme has reached over 3000 young people, helping them to learn more about London’s green spaces”

“Our sessions provide insight into a range of interesting scientific careers, including engineering, ecology and geology.”

“Students also get to apply their scientific skills in an exciting real world context.”

Ponds Project education sessions run until July 2017 with spaces still available for schools.

Hampstead Heath is located 3.5 miles from Trafalgar Square and receives over 7 million visits a year. The City Corporation spends more than £5 million a year to maintain the Heath which includes a zoo, an athletics track, an education centre, extensive children's facilities, three swimming ponds and a Lido.

The City of London Corporation manages 11,000 acres of green space across London and south east England, including Epping Forest and Burnham Beeches, with many of its sites designated National nature Reserves and Sites of Special Scientific Interest for their unique ecology and rare plant species.

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Over 4000 school children have taken part in a free and innovative outdoor education project.

The City of London Corporation, which manages Hampstead Heath, has created the free Ponds Project Education Programme to take advantage of learning opportunities provided by a dam-strengthening engineering scheme on some of Heath’s ponds.

Activities include building mini-dams, investigating water quality and exploring the properties of soil.

The sessions, both practical and classroom based, are available to secondary schools and aim to educate young people in a range of topics, including science, geography and citizenship.

The programme has engaged over 3300 secondary students in 25 different schools and nearly 1000 primary school children.

The project is part of the Hampstead Heath Ponds Project, a complex engineering and landscaping development, designed to make sure that the earth dams on the Heath can withstand extreme rainfall events.

Archaeological findings, some thousands of years old, have been uncovered during the Ponds Project.

Susie Glover, Education Project Officer at the City of London Corporation, said:

“The Ponds Project Education Programme has reached over 3000 young people, helping them to learn more about London’s green spaces”

“Our sessions provide insight into a range of interesting scientific careers, including engineering, ecology and geology.”

“Students also get to apply their scientific skills in an exciting real world context.”

Ponds Project education sessions run until July 2017 with spaces still available for schools.

Hampstead Heath is located 3.5 miles from Trafalgar Square and receives over 7 million visits a year. The City Corporation spends more than £5 million a year to maintain the Heath which includes a zoo, an athletics track, an education centre, extensive children's facilities, three swimming ponds and a Lido.

The City of London Corporation manages 11,000 acres of green space across London and south east England, including Epping Forest and Burnham Beeches, with many of its sites designated National nature Reserves and Sites of Special Scientific Interest for their unique ecology and rare plant species.

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